MITCHELL ART GALLERY

Articles of Faith

PAST EXHIBITION | SEPTEMBER 16 – DECEMBER 8, 2021

at arms length

Emmanuel Osahor, Sylvia’s Garden (Composite, Version 1), 2021. Digital rendering. Image courtesy of the Artist.

“...it is not without reason that faith has been compared to an anchor that has caught on the bottom and checked the vessel in its course, while the open and free ocean stretched beyond as far as the eye can reach. And who shall break the anchor from his heart? When you shake it loose in one place, faith settles its hold somewhere else....”

– Jean-Marie Guyau, The Non-Religion of the Future: A Sociological Study

Articles of Faith brings together artworks that explore how faith tethers us, often through ancestral practices, and whether or not we choose it. Featuring the works of Borys Tarasenko, Emmanuel Osahor, Olivia Johnston, and Thirza Cuthand, this exhibition demonstrates the omnipresence of faith practices that at once provide us a deeply historical visual language to describe sacredness where it is often neglected, while also colluding with colonialism and other systems of oppression.

Articles of Faith is informed by the experiences artists shared with curator Carolyn Jervis and sociologist Dr. Robin Willey in interviews conducted as part of a four year multi-sited ethnographic research project that explores relationships between art and faith.

This exhibition and research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, MacEwan University, and Concordia University of Edmonton.

Olivia Johnston, Saint Kathryn, 2021. Photograph on viny

Olivia Johnston, Saint Kathryn, 2021. Photograph on vinyl. Courtesy of the Artist.

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Virtual Tour

View the exhibition

Call for Applications: Creating Conversations about Faith Through Art Panel

We invite undergraduates, emerging scholars and artists to submit abstracts for consideration for the in-person Articles of Faith Symposium: Art and Christian Hegemony in a Time of Colonial Reckoning, at MacEwan University, Saturday, May 28, 2022.

Historically, Christianity has used art and material culture to reproduce ideology. Contemporary artists and scholars are rethinking the relationship between religious beliefs, practices, and material culture to create space for conversations that are often difficult to discuss within traditional faith communities. Delving into these challenging topics allows for a deeper exploration of the ways in which religion affects communities and individuals – both positively and negatively.

Examining the intersections between religion and art can allow for a deeper exploration of contemporary tensions, power relationships and ideas around how religion has affected history and lived experiences.

Submission Guidelines

All submissions must be emailed to rschmid1@student.concordia.ab.ca by March 23, 2022 and include the following information:

  • Title
  • Name
  • Academic affiliation (if applicable)
  • Abstract (300 words)
  • Creative work submissions, including but not limited to visual art, must include images or other documentation of the work in addition to the 300-word abstract

Submissions will be adjudicated by research assistants Bec Schmidt and Megan Klak.

Potential topics could include:

  • Religious influences on creative practices
  • Using art to reconnect, navigate and/or decolonize religiosity
  • Utopian themes in religion and art
  • Art as a way to reveal and deconstruct the sacred
  • Using art to reflect on the omnipresence and/or hegemony of religious discourses
  • Finding controversy, paradox or tensions in religion, through art or creative practice
  • Reflection on personal spiritual and religious practice

Articles of Faith is an exhibition and research project informed by the experiences artists shared with curator Carolyn Jervis and sociologist Dr. Robin Willey in interviews conducted as part of a four-year multi-sited ethnographic research project that explores relationships between art and faith.

The symposium, exhibition, and research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, MacEwan University, and Concordia University of Edmonton.

John and Maggie Mitchell Art Gallery (MAG)

MacEwan.ca/MitchellArtGallery